Friday, February 21, 2014

Upside Down?

It’s hard to believe that it has been over a month since TREWGrip made its international debut at CES.  I want to thank everyone who supported our efforts and helped us promote TREWGrip. I also want to thank those of you who have recently begun following and sharing TREWGrip on social media.  We are gaining significant traction, and beginning to make an impact in the consumer electronics industry.

During CES, quite a few interesting articles were written by a variety of media outlets, and there were also quite a few interesting comments posted online.  With any attempt at innovation or disruptive technology, there are always the naysayers and the skeptics --- comes with the territory.  But there are also those people who catch my attention by providing insightful feedback --- these are the people who help me see TREWGrip from a different perspective.

As a kid, I remember vividly the challenges associated with getting catsup out of a glass bottle.  When I opened a new bottle, it was almost impossible to get the catsup flowing, and there were several tricks that I would use to overcome this problem.

The first wasn't really a trick, rather the use of brute force by pounding on the bottom of the bottle with the palm of my hand.  This approach typically resulted in catsup spatter all over my burger or hotdog, and sometimes an embarrassing stain on my pants (but that’s a story for another post).

A more sophisticated approach involved sticking a knife in the end of the bottle to get the catsup flowing.  Although admittedly a bit more civilized than brute force, for some reason people would always ask me if I wanted a hotdog with my catsup --- I think it had something to do with the amount of catsup on my hotdog.

Now there was one trick that some people would use that required a bit of skill.  And the people who mastered this trick would always try to coach people who used another method.  The trick was to tilt the bottle at just the right angle as though you were pouring it, and then tap the 57 with the palm of your hand.  As the catsup began to flow, you would have to adjust the angle of the bottle and your tapping force to control the flow of catsup.  Or at least that was how I was coached to do it.  Can't say I ever really mastered it.

Once a bottle was opened and catsup flowed for the first time, pouring seemed a bit easier, especially when the catsup was kept at room temperature.  There were still times, however, especially if the bottle was stored in the refrigerator, when I would have to violently shake the bottle up and down until the catsup came out.

And don’t even get me started on a bottle that was almost finished.  Most times, I would turn the bottle upside down and lean it against something until the catsup followed down into the cap; resulting in a crusty cap full of catsup.

Then one day someone in the catsup industry invented a new type of bottle; a squeeze bottle with an oversized cap.  Now there were squeeze bottles with pointy tops that were mainly used in restaurants, but this new bottle was different --- it was designed to be stored upside down.

Nowadays when people see catsup bottles with oversized caps, or “upside down” catsup bottles… well, it just seems to make sense.



So my question is --- who decides what’s “right side up” and what’s “upside down?”  Or, is something considered upside down simply because another way is just the way it’s always been?

We didn’t design TREWGrip as an upside down keyboard. We did it because it just makes sense!

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